Click any of the Palm Tree images to enter gallery of palms.


Banana Palm

Height: 10’-20’

Spread: 5’ canopy in diameter

Leaf: usually 3’ long and about a foot wide

Range: Banana foliage will freeze at 32 degrees F

General Care Tips:

Bananas require copious amounts of water to grow and sustain fruit. Cutting the tree mid-way up the trunk and rapping the cane in burlap or frost cloth during the winter months will help with reaching maximum height after the winter months have passed. Banana plants are not a true palm.


California Palm

Height: 50-70’

Spread: 10 to 14 feet in diameter

Leaf: Fanned, 4’-6’ from trunk to tip, 3’-5’ wide

Range: Little to no problem at 15 degrees F, thought to be hardy to 0 degrees F (USDA zones 8b-11)

General Care Tips:

Adequate irrigation, however, lawn or surface irrigation is not sufficient. Plant needs to be deep irrigated at least twice a month, and once a week during the hottest part of the year (95 degrees F or above, for an extended period). Watch for necrosis (dead tissue), yellow, or brown patches on the fronds of the tree, as this can be a sign of mal-nutrition. Depending on where the patches occur, usually determine what mineral the palm lacks. If dark green foliage turns light this usually indicates the palm is low on Nitrogen. Check for disease and insect infestation. Often insect infestation leads to fungal invasion.



Canary Island Palm

Height: : 40’-60’

Spread: Up to 20’ in diameter

Leaf: 10’-20’ in length often hanging, 1.5’ wide

Range: Foliage hardy to at least 21 degrees F, however, our canaries have tolerated much colder in San Antonio. (USDA zones 8b-11)

General Care Tips:

Date palms need ample room for development. Even as a young plant the canopy can reach fifteen feet in diameter. This plant needs lots of sun light. Adequate irrigation, however, lawn or surface irrigation is not sufficient. Plant needs to be deep irrigated at least once a month, and once a week during the hottest part of the year (95 degrees F or above, for an extended period). Watch for necrosis (dead tissue), yellow, or brown patches on the fronds of the tree, as this might be a sign of mal-nutrition. Depending on where the patches occur, usually determine what mineral the palm lacks. If dark green foliage turns light this usually indicates the palm is low on Nitrogen. Check for disease and insect infestation. Often insect infestation leads to fungal invasion. It is very helpful to keep grass from encroaching on the trunk of this palm because of the air-roots near the base of the plant. The fronds turn yellow usually to alack of magnesium in the soil. Just about any soil is acceptable as long as there is good drainage, though it is wise to provide a Mg supplement when necessary.



Majestic Palm

Height: 20’-30’

Spread: 4’-8’ in diameter

Leaf: Feathered and weeping, the leaves protrude up from the trunk and hang down creating a U shaped character.

Range: Not a cold hardy palm, however, wrapping and mulch may help.

General Care Tips:

Adequate irrigation, balanced fertilizer



Mediterranean Palm

Height: 10’-25’, often grows in clumps

Spread: 6’-8’

Leaf: Fanned, 3’ wide, 2’ long, the stem of the leaf is covered on the edges with cat claw like spines pointing toward the leaf

Range: Range: no problems at 16 degrees F, thought to be hardy to 0 degrees F (USDA zones 8-11)

General Care Tips:

The Mediterranean palm is a very tolerant palm; it will grow in just about any soil type and is loved in hot regions that may have a brisk winter because of its hardiness to the cold. Adequate irrigation, however, lawn or surface irrigation is insufficient. Plant needs to be deep irrigated at least twice a month, and possibly once a week during the hottest part of the year (95 degrees F or above, for an extended period). Watch for necrosis (dead tissue), yellow, or brown patches on the fronds of the tree, as this is a sign of mal-nutrition. Depending on where the patches occur, usually determines what mineral the palm lacks. If dark green foliage turns light this usually indicates the palm is low on Nitrogen. Check for disease and insect infestation. Often insect infestation leads to fungal invasion. This palm likes sunlight but will still look great grown in light shade.



Pindo Palm

Height: 15’

Spread: 10’-12’ diameter

Leaf: Feathered, with leaflets protruding up on each side to form a distinct V shape, 4’- 6’ long, 1’ in width

Range: No damage at 14 degrees F, thought to be hardy to 10 degrees F (USDA zones 8-10b)

General Care Tips:

The Pindo palm is the most hardy of the feather leafed palms, it is drought resistant and cold tolerant. Deep irrigation, however, lawn or surface irrigation is often adequate. Plant needs to be deep irrigated at least once a month, and once a week during the hottest part of the year (95 degrees F or above, for an extended period). Watch for necrosis (dead tissue), yellow, or brown patches on the fronds of the tree, as this might be a sign of mal-nutrition. Depending on where the patches occur usually determines what mineral the palm lacks. If dark green foliage turns light this usually indicates the palm is low on Nitrogen. Check for disease and insect infestation. Often insect infestation leads to fungal invasion.



Robolini

Height: 10’-15’, often grows in clumps

Spread: 6-10’ in diameter

Leaf: Feathered, 3’-5’ long, about a foot wide, hard and spiny the closer in you get to the trunk

Range: Thought to withstand 20 degrees F, depending on the health of the plant, foliage will burn at 28 degrees F. (USDA zones 9-11)

General Care Tips:

Move indoors or cover and protect for the winter. Palm requires ample amounts of water and desires direct sunlight at midday. The palm will do all right in the shade and is considered a fantastic in the home plant.



Queen Palm

Height: 40’

Spread: 15’-20’ in diameter

Leaf: 6’-8’ long, about 1’-1.5’ wide, has a beautiful weeping look

Range: The leaf tips will burn at 25 degrees F, not likely to survive below 15 degrees F (USDA zones 9b-11)

General Care Tips:

Adequate irrigation, however, lawn or surface irrigation is insufficient. Plant needs to be deep irrigated at least twice a month, and possibly once a week during the hottest part of the year (95 degrees F or above, for an extended period). Watch for necrosis (dead tissue), yellow, or brown patches on the fronds of the tree, as this is a sign of mal-nutrition. Depending on where the patches occur, usually determines what mineral the palm lacks. If dark green foliage turns light this usually indicates the palm is low on Nitrogen. Check for disease and insect infestation. Often insect infestation leads to fungal invasion.



Sabal Palm

Height: Up to fifty feet or taller

Spread: Massive canopy

Leaf: Fanned leaf with V shaped groves running from the base to the tip, 5’-8’ wide, 5’-6’ long, V shaped segments 2-3” across

Range: Hardy to at least 8 degrees F, and have been reported to survive sub-zero temperatures (USDA zones 8b-11)

General Care Tips:

Adequate irrigation, however, lawn or surface irrigation is in sufficient. Plant needs to be deep irrigated at least twice a month, and possibly once a week during the hottest part of the year (95 degrees F or above, for an extended period). Watch for necrosis (dead tissue), yellow, or brown patches on the fronds of the tree, as this might be a sign of mal-nutrition. Depending on where the patches occur, usually determines what mineral the palm lacks. If dark green foliage turns light this usually indicates the palm is low on Nitrogen. Check for disease and insect infestation. Often insect infestation leads to fungal invasion.



Sago Palm

Height: 4-9’

Spread: Canopy can grow as large as 8’ in diameter, extremely slow growing

Leaf: Feathered leaf with 3-4” firm leaflets that have a tiny spine at the tip, usually about 4’ long, 6” wide

Range: Thought to be cold hardy to 10 degrees F, foliage will burn at temperatures below 25 degrees F.  (USDA zones 9-11)

General Care Tips:

Wrapping the head in burlap or frost cloth and mulching the base will provide adequate protection against a moderate freeze.



Windmill Palm

Height: 25’-40’

Spread: Canopy of several feet in diameter

Leaf: Fanned leaves that split just before the tips to form segments, 3-4’ long, 2.5-3’ wide

Range: Cold hardy palm, however, will receive damage at 10 to 12 degrees F, thought to be hardy to 0 degrees F (USDA zones 8-10a)

General Care Tips:

Adequate irrigation, however, lawn or surface irrigation is insufficient. Plant needs to be deep irrigated at least twice a month, and possibly once a week during the hottest part of the year (95 degrees F or above, for an extended period). Watch for necrosis (dead tissue), yellow, or brown patches on the fronds of the tree, as this might be a sign of mal-nutrition. Depending on where the patches occur, usually determines what mineral the palm lacks. If dark green foliage turns light this usually indicates the palm is low on Nitrogen. Check for disease and insect infestation. Often insect infestation leads to fungal invasion. This palm is non-tolerant to salt. Windmills do not like tropical climates and large specimens planted in that climate will be short lived.